Saturday, August 24, 2013

The World's End


The World's End is (sadly, but in a good way) the final chapter in the blood and ice cream trilogy from Director Edgar Wright, and it is a film, much like the other 2 about growing up. Five childhood friends decided to reattempt a legendary pub crawl that they failed to finish in their teen years. As the five unite, out of either guilt for the state of the man that brought them together (Simon Pegg) or just for a chance to see the other 4 one more time. As the night goes on, they realize some things never change, but as the 5 delve deeper into the pub crawl, they realize that it's the town that has changed. It has a lot to say about friendship, camaraderie, letting go of your past, reliance on technology, keeping up with the Jonses, and accepting people for who they are. Edgar Wright is one of the finest story tellers working today. His movies have so much subtlety that it puts Citizen Kane to shame. Not that I would make that comparison. This film is not as action packed as the last 2 entries, which I thought was a strange surprise, but that is okay, because all of the characters and the dialogue were great, which was expected. It also had some fun role reversal, where Simon Pegg was the man child and Nick Frost was the grown up. Even though Pegg's character was a huge piece of shit, I still really cared about him and sympathized with him, because he just wanted to accomplish something. He was clearly living in the past because his life was never as good as it was the last time they tried that pub crawl. Once the sci fi started kicking in, I almost forgot it was that kind of movie, because I cared so much about the relationships and the interactions between the characters. Of course having fun action scenes with A.I creatures is always fun. This is one of the best films of the year and a perfect way to both end the summer, end the cornetto trilogy, and wash the taste of You're Next out of my mouth. And like Hot Fuzz, it features James Bond. Highly recommend it, and it is a good time for all
   -L.K

Home Alone 5


Home Alone 5 (also known in North America as You're Next) is a basically the same plot as the other Home Alone movies, where invaders invade and somebody sets traps to deal with them, except this time, the main character is Kevin McCallister's girlfriend, who is an ex-green beret, for some reason. So the plot is, the McCallister parents are celebrating their 35th anniversary, so all the kids are gathered around, as are each child's respective squeeze, bickering ensues and then the wet bandits make their strike. Except this time, in order to get the McCallister's money, they are just planning on killing everyone in the house. So, like all pointless sequels, everything is recycled from the previous Home Alone entries, and they even go as far as shamelessly robbing ideas from 80's slasher movies. The score is forcibly 80's synth, the deaths are uninteresting, Kevin is a pussy, his girlfriend is likable, even though she manages to kill every single person by herself, but all the other characters are so unlikable, that I couldn't wait for them to die. The gore wasn't even good. All the deaths were off screen, followed by a shot of a prosthetic tool inside someone's body. After all this time, you think they would just let the Home Alone franchise die, but instead they had to make a new one "dark and gritty". It actually felt like Silent House, if somebody forced the director to direct a script with coherence. I hated just about every aspect of this film: the characters sucked, the camera work was obnoxious (sooooo much shaky cam) the editing was poor, the deaths weren't gruesome enough, and it just felt like a series of recycled ideas that didn't work as intended. It was all a bunch of Hipster bullshit, and I don't like it
    -L.K

Friday, August 9, 2013

Elysium


Elysium is a Science Fiction film, that takes place in the future; where the wealthy live in the apple store (here called Elysium), in space, and the poor live in Mexico. The wealthy consist of attractive white people, and the poor are Mexicans, Filipinos and Matt Damon. The plot is that wealthy people get to live in a utopia, and the poor live in...Mexico, and the poor want to get to the utopia, because there is a cure for everything on Elysium. Matt Damon gets poisoned and, as a last ditch effort, returns to a life of crime in exchange for an illegal ride to Elysium. After that, the film becomes standard blockbuster fare, and not in a modern sense. It was actually very entertaining. It moved along very nicely, the action scenes were cool, Sharlto Copley was incredibly scene stealy, but the best part of all was the look to the film. Aside from some questionable slow motion shot, they film was always pleasing to look at. I really get the impression that this was meant to be a summer blockbuster, as opposed to the much deeper District 9. Its really nice to see a summer blockbuster that is rated R. I like seeing blood in my action films. It's almost a lost art. Its rare to see films like that nowadays. The 80's are over, so we are all out of Robocop, Rambo, and The Running Man. Instead we either get a superhero movie, or some other crappy brand name with an inflated budget and way too much CG. This was a nice in between modern blockbusters and 80's action films. It wasn't deep, but it had a certain visceral punch. I really didn't care about any of the characters, but at the time when I realized that I didn't give a shit about any of the characters, I realized that I really liked all the tech. The guns were really sweet. I don't normally care about guns, but these were really cool. I liked that instead of making shiny and polished CG effects, they actually decided to make the guns, armor, robots and such creative and cool. The stuff on Elysium was really pretty and shiny, but all the instruments of war were gritty and reflections of the world they were a necessity for. One thing worth noting, that I think is very funny, is that this film has the exact same ending as Jason X. I say, give it a watch, because I think good R rated films are worthy of your support, instead of shit like Grown Ups 2 and We're the Millers.
    -L.K